You can tell when someone falls in love with a journey, a destination, a piece of history. Looking through the lens of travel writer and photographer Tammy Lee Bradley, you can understand why Liberty County is easy to love. These are just some of the exquisite photos Tammy Lee took while she visited here, and she describes each location with a sense of wonder and infatuation, with a thirst for more. Enjoy this photo blog journey!

 

Director Diane Kroell in the side garden of the Midway Museum – Georgia's Only Colonial Museum. That adorable building is the kitchen complete with cooking hearth, farm table, and loft above. Tiny home lovers like myself will swoon over the architecture. In 1777 St. John's Parish, St. Andrew's Parish, and St. James' Parish combined to become Liberty County. Because St. John's Parish was the first in Georgia to vote for liberty, the new county created was given the name Liberty. In the museum, you will learn more about the three Georgia signers of the Declaration of Independence. I will be sharing images from the Historic landmarks in this area which include the Midway Church, Cemetary and Midway Museum (collectively known as the Midway Historic District). The Midway Museum (located on Highway 17) is home to documents, exhibits, and furnishings which commemorate and affirm the love of Liberty. #travelblogger #travelphotographer #exploregeorgia #exploreliberty #southerndelightsanddaytrips #history #historic #coastal #daytrip @exploreliberty @exploregeorgia @visittheusa @ustravel_association #visittheusa #huffpostgram #travelabout #roadtripusa @gaconservancy #thisismygeorgia @southeasttourismsociety #mirrorless #shootmirrorless #visittheusa #visitthesouth #thisismysouth

A photo posted by Travel ???? – Tammy Lee Bradley (@tamleebradley) on

On my second day touring Liberty County, we made a stop at the Dorchester Academy and Museum in Midway Georgia. This historic site is located at the corner of East Oglethorpe Highway (US Route 84) and Lewis Fraser Road. The starting point for each tour is the museum located in a small building in front of the dormitory. Inside you will be greeted by a friendly volunteer staff and be given a brief tour. You learn about the history of the buildings, the young men that attended the school, and those that were activists for African-American education and civil rights. My tour guide, Mr. Bacon, commented on how my eyes lit up and how history “just gets in your blood.” It does indeed. Have I mentioned lately how much I love historic coastal Georgia? Currently undergoing extensive restoration, the main building, a beautiful two-story Georgian Revival dormitory, was built to educate freed slaves after the Civil War. By 1917, the fully-accredited high school consisted of multiple buildings and almost 300 students. Unfortunately many of the buildings were destroyed by fire in the 1930’s or torn down after the school closed in 1940. As you walk through the halls and the auditorium, you can get a feel of the building’s past and imagine the lives that were changed by the availability of such a high level of learning. Our tour guide mentioned that the education provided surpassed what was standard at the time and allowed many of the boys to proceed into high level positions without the need of college. In 1961, the remaining building was converted for use as a civil rights center and Dr. Martin Luther King stayed on site before his march on Birmingham in 1963. A room which bears his name can still be seen as you tour the facility. The Dorchester Academy, while having one foot in the past and rich in African-American history, has a very bright future. The nearly complete restoration process will enable the building to be used once again by the community. I look forward to a return visit. The history book for this site has many more chapters. more pics on blog. @exploreliberty @exploregeorgia #southerndelightsanddaytrips #shootmirrorless #visittheusa #visitthesouth

A photo posted by Travel ???? – Tammy Lee Bradley (@tamleebradley) on

More photos on the Blog ⬆ A visit to the Geechee Kunda Cultural Center in Riceboro is a must when visiting Georgia. I spent hours with Jim Bacote and his sister Bethany and it still wasn’t enough. It was my favorite stop on my journey through @exploreliberty Their genuine hospitality and desire to share the history of the Gullah/Geechee people was inspiring. The kunda (which means compound or home of hope) is located on lands where the rice, cotton, and indigo once grew as part of the “Retreat Plantation.” It is now sacred land and a spiritual center for Africans in America. “The Gullah/Geechee Nation exists from Jacksonville, NC to Jacksonville, FL. It encompasses all of the Sea Islands and thirty to thirty-five miles inland to the St. John’s River. On these islands, people from numerous African ethnic groups linked with indigenous Americans and created the unique Gullah language and traditions from which later came “Geechee.” The Gullah/Geechee people have been considered “a nation within a nation” from the time of chattel enslavement in the United States until they officially became an internationally recognized nation on July 2, 2000. At the time of their declaration as a nation, they confirmed the election of their first “head pun de boddee”-head of state and official spokesperson and queen mother. They elected Queen Quet, Chieftess and Head-of-State for the Gullah/Geechee Nation ).” Exhibit galleries, a gift shop, a family research center, and ongoing documentation are all part of the center’s efforts to keep the Gullah/Geechee culture alive and growing. If you are fortunate enough to have Jim make you lunch, you are in for a treat. Fried lobster, whiting, sweet Georgia white shrimp, corn on the cob, pasta salad, and spinach salad with fresh strawberries were prepared just for us. You won’t find a better meal in town. I promise! A historic building has been moved onto the property and will soon be restored for use again as a Praise Hall. Call and response praise events, complete with live music, are something I would like to see. I look forward to returning with my family. They are constantly adding to the center so each trip will be a delight.

A photo posted by Travel ???? – Tammy Lee Bradley (@tamleebradley) on

The Midway Congregational Church. ⤵ Visit Liberty County in Georgia. One of 6 coastal counties to explore this summer. @exploreliberty @exploregeorgia A favorite stop during my stay in Liberty County Georgia, the Midway Historic District was educational as well as enchanting. The museum’s Executive Director Diane Kroell, dressed in period costume, provides visitors with an in-depth tour of the Midway Museum, the Midway Congregational Church, and Cemetery. I was particularly smitten with the interior of the church. The construction, millwork details, high ceilings, sweeping balcony, and swinging pew doors are exquisite. The balcony was a later addition to allow blacks and whites to worship together. The blacks sat in the free seats in the balcony and the whites in the family owned pews below. As I sat in the balcony, I kept thinking of the pastor in the movie Pollyanna. I could just picture a sermon being delivered from the lofty pulpit as children squirmed and ladies in proper church attire cooled themselves with fans. More pics on the blog. #southerndelightsanddaytrips #travelblogger #instatravel #Georgia @visittheusa #roadtripusa #travel #southern #south #exploregeorgia #coastalGA #coastaltown

A photo posted by Travel ???? – Tammy Lee Bradley (@tamleebradley) on

 

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