Six Sure-Fire Signs that You’re From the South

Categories: News,The Right Blend Blog

Blackbird

If you’ve never lived south of the Mason-Dixon Line then you may not agree with me, but there’s definitely something to be said for those of us that call ourselves “Southerners.”  The South isn’t just a region of the U.S., there’s a specific culture here, and it’s one that we’re REALLY proud of.

I’m not talking about confederate flags. I’m talking about sweet tea and Southern hospitality. Saying ma’am and sir, please and thank you.  Being Southern means many things, but to me, it represents being raised to be respectful and kind to others. Don’t get me wrong, there are mean people in the South, and there are plenty who classify as Southerners that don’t exemplify these qualities, but I like to think those people are exceptions to the rule.

 

  1. The word y’all is a staple of your vocabulary. No one raised in the South can escape the use of this word (it’s even in Webster’s dictionary now). Come on now y’all, it just sounds better than you guys or you all anyway!
  1. You live by the saying “You’ll catch more flies with honey.” If you’ve ever watched Gone with the Wind you know that everyone liked Melanie more than Scarlett. Southern belles are supposed to be sweet and polite. You’d be surprised how far a smile and friendly laugh will get you. In the South, manners aren’t just important, they are essential.
  1. Riding down dirt roads is a form of entertainment. I personally have spent many nights riding dirt roads blaring country music and laughing with great friends. Those of us that were raised in the South know that some problems just call for a ride down an old dirt road. In the words of Brooks and Dunn:

We’d turn out the headlights
Drive by the moonlight
Talk about what the future might hold
Down a red dirt road

  1. Your family may be crazy but they’re more important than anything else! Family first is something that we hold true to. You may not like that crazy your uncle talks too loud and makes inappropriate jokes, but you sure do have to love him!
  1. You have at least one friend/family member that uses words/sayings that would be considered Southern jargon, otherwise known as Southernisms. The list of these Southernisms is nearly endless, but these are a few of my favorites:

Skedaddle- leave quickly

Hissy Fit- loss of temper (I may have thrown a few of these on occasion)

I’m fixin’ to – about to

Bless your heart- a polite way to make fun of someone (although I’m not sure about the actual politeness of it)

Crazy as a sprayed roach- this one is pretty self-explanatory

 

The list could go on forever… we have a language of our own; maybe Webster should create a unique Southern dictionary. I guarantee that book would sell like hotcakes, didn’t I mention we Southerners are proud?

 

  1. You believe a home-cooked meal must be prepared with vegetable oil, Crisco, or butter. True Southerners enjoy their fried food and don’t forget the sweet tea to wash it down. OK, I know Southern food isn’t what you call healthy, but it dang sure tastes good! There is a reason why we’re known for our cooking!

There are absolutely TONS of other things that make the South so special, so this is just a glimpse. I’ll leave you with this.

“Being Southern isn’t talking with an accent…or rocking on a porch while drinking sweet tea, or knowing how to tell a good story. It’s how you’re brought up — with Southerners, family (blood kin or not) is sacred; you respect others and are polite nearly to a fault; you always know your place but are fierce about your beliefs. And food along with college football — is darn near a religion.” ― Jan Norris

-Molly O’Hearon, Public Information Assistant for the Chamber/CVB

The Right Blend Blog is written by three different authors employed by the Liberty County Chamber/CVB. As we are able, we rotate weeks and each write about our individual experiences, opinions and let our writing reflect our personalities and creativity. All content provided on The Right Blend blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site.